Welp, it’s definitely not Monday, but I still read some things

This was a good weekend. I went to a wedding, which…I love weddings. I don’t ever want to have a wedding (at least not in the traditional sense), but they are a delight. Anyway, the couple was super cute and happy even if there was a slight rain delay. (It’s been bone dry for weeks so of course it finally rains on the day of their wedding. Of course.)

Anyway, some slight changes had to be made to accommodate the weather, but everything after that was two thumbs up, fine holiday fun.

Then, on Sunday, my daughter and I went to my parents’ to spend Mother’s Day with my mom, and we taught my daughter how to play Spades. She’s almost ready for college for real now.

We also watched Miss India America, which is really cute and fun and a great example of a compelling, though mostly unlikable protagonist. It’s also streaming on Netflix. Ahem.


Now that I’m back to a regular one-a-week posting schedule, I probably won’t keep up with this section of my weekly check-in, but I did post two things last week, so:


So I read some books:

The Buddha in the AtticThe Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I listened to the audio version of this book, which I think suits the narrative style well. It’s told in first-person plural which both highlights that this is a collective story and also makes sense for an oral recollection. I can honestly say I’m not sure how that would hold up on paper.

So yeah I super dug the use of first-person plural because of the collective nature but I also liked that often the author would show differentiation in the women’s stories by giving singular experiences. Super powerful and effective.

That ending. Man.

View all my reviews

The Hundred DressesThe Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I listened to the audiobook (on CD!), and it was only one hour. One! And one disc. One! I don’t think that’s ever happened before.

Anyway, this story about being a bystander to bullying and having compassion and empathy for people is timeless and timely. It explores the benefits of not speaking up (Maddie doesn’t want to remind Peggy [the main bully] that she [Maddie] is also poor which would call negative attention to herself). And this may be one of the most clear explanations of making amends for children I have read in a long time. Nicely done.

I do wish the narrator sounded a little younger when reading the kids’ voices, but that is a small complaint because it really is like having a teacher read you the book in that respect, so. (This would probably be a 4-star book if I read it on paper, but I kept getting sleepy while listening in the car hence the lower rating. It’s solid, though!)

View all my reviews

The King of Attolia (The Queen's Thief, #3)The King of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I was all set to write my review, and now I’m distracted because I see that they whitewashed the cover. UGH.

Anywheedle, tonight I discovered that I dig this series because I am a huge fan of the long con, and all three of the books in the series I have read have delivered on this point. “Why am I digging this book so much?” I kept asking myself. And now I know. I love seeing how it all comes together.

Also, Gen is A+++. As is Attolia. So there is also that.

View all my reviews


I am still making my way through An Extraordinary Union by Alyssa Cole. Not going to lie: I am struggling a bit. I am interested in the spy stuff for sure, but I am finding the romance SO DISTRACTING. Ugh.

I don’t mind books with romance, and I don’t dislike romance novels. But it’s like every time something super interesting happens with the spy stuff, there is romance stuff that I care about NOT AT ALL and there are some erotic moments and I HATE READING SEX SCENES (they are so boring. I mean, I get it: you’re having sex) and about the slickness between her thighs and the thickening of his shaft (I mean, seriously 🙄) (even more frustrating, I can’t skip these scenes because actual character stuff is happening) and I JUST WANT TO GET BACK TO THE SPY STUFF. So. That’s where I am.

I am going to finish the book because the spy stuff is good, and I am loving all of the commentary on race relations and nationalism and the Civil War. I just…haven’t found a way to temper my expectations from (a) reading the prologue and (b) not reading the back of the book.

Kidlit version hosted by Kellee Moye of Unleashing Readers and Jen of Teach Mentor Texts; original version hosted by Kathryn at Book Date.

Have a great week, everyone!

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7 comments

  1. A.M.B.

    I hate reading sex scenes too. They usually make me laugh (because of the way it gets described), and I know that’s not the reaction the author intended!

    Like

  2. Ally Bean

    I read The Buddha in the Attic and didn’t much care for it. I remember that I finished it, but thought why did I?

    On a completely different note, I’m currently reading Cursed by Bruce Coville. Yes, I know it’s for ages 8-12, but what is age but an arbitrary number? It’s a cute story and now I’m smittened [smote?] with brownie folklore.

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    • Akilah

      You know I read a ton of middle grade/children’s lit so age is an arbitrary number when it comes to awesome stories for me, for sure.

      I don’t think I would have liked Buddha in the Attic if I had read the paper version. I think only the first and maybe last two chapters would work in a traditional book.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Jenny @ Reading the End

    Hahahahaha I cracked up over your rant about romance novels. I love them, but I sympathize with your position — if you wanted straight spy stories, I get why it would be maddening for everyone’s shaft to be thickening all over the place. I do love Alyssa Cole though, and An Extraordinary Union was awesome.

    Also MANY YAYS to Megan Whalen Turner. I have her new book in my greedy hands right now and I am THE MOST excited about it.

    Like

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